Yours Sincerely

Yours Sincerely, Best Regards, Best Or Regards -- When To Use Them


Yours Sincerely, Best Regards, Best Or Regards -- When To Use Them


Knowing how to write a good letter in English is necessary especially when you are working in an international company. Whether it's a regular mail or an e-mail, you should compose a well-written letter. It is easy to write the opening salutation, but many are having inquiries about what should the proper valediction be in their letters. We'll discuss the difference between the two kinds of valedictions -- the formal and informal.


Know Your Audience

When choosing the complimentary close, know your audience. Why is this important? Your choice of valediction reflects your degree of relationship with the recipient of the letter. Using the informal form to someone you do not personally know might indicate overfamiliarity and, in some cases, rudeness. On the other hand, using the formal form to someone you personally know might suggest estrangement on your part. So always remember to choose the best complimentary close for your letter because we do not want to give our readers the wrong impression about how we view them.


Yours Sincerely

"Yours sincerely" is a formal British English valediction. Its American English counterpart is "Sincerely yours." It is used when you know the name of the recipient of your letter, but he or she is NOT a close friend or a colleague. If you do not know the name of the recipient, use "Yours faithfully."

Examples:

"Dear Mr. Joe," .......... "Yours sincerely,"
"Dear Ms. Joe," ........... "Yours sincerely,"
"Dear Mrs. Joe," ........... "Yours sincerely,"

Note that you should CAPITALIZE the first letter -- Yours sincerely. Below are the incorrect ways to write it.

Yours Sincerely,
yours sincerely,
yours Sincerely,

Also, do not forget to put a comma after the valediction before writing your name under it.

"Yours sincerely" and "Sincerely yours" must not be interchanged, because the latter indicates intimacy. Never use "Sincerely Yours" in a formal letter addressed to someone you do not personally know.


Best Regards

"Best regards" is an informal valediction. It is the same as "Kind Regards" and "Kindest Regards." "Best wishes" is also another option. You can use any of the four. There are no known different underlying meanings to each. They suggest friendliness and familiarity to the recipient. Use "Best regards" when you personally know the recipient and he or she is a close friend or a colleague. You can use this when sending a letter or an email to your professor, your classmates, or your loved ones.

Examples:

"Dear Susan," ...... "Best regards,"
"Dear Professor Burton,"......"Best regards,"
"Dear Teacher Allison," ....... "Best regards,"

Note that you should CAPITALIZE the first letter -- Best regards. Below are the incorrect ways to write it.

Best Regards,
best regards,
best Regards,

Also, do not forget to put a comma after the valediction before writing your name under it.


Regards or Best

"Regards" or "Best" are more informal forms of valediction. It is only used to letters whose recipients are your family members or close friends. They can be used interchangeably. Do not use them to people who are of higher authority than you, like your professor or boss.

Examples:

"Dear mama," ....... "Best,"
"Dear Jonas," ....... "Regards,"

Always CAPITALIZE the first letter. Below are the incorrect ways to write them.

best
regards

Also, do not forget to put a comma after the valediction before writing your name under it.


Some people choose not to write a complimentary close or use words like "Cheers," "All is well," or simply "Thanks." This is becoming popular, but putting a good closing is always the better choice.

Tags: Yours Sincerely, Best Regards, Best, Regards




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